COVID-19 UPDATE: Travel restrictions and other information for U.S. Passport holders.

Travel Warnings 2020

Caution - Travel Warnings

When planning a trip abroad, it is essential that you stay up to date on the latest travel advisories issued by the U.S. Department of State. These travel warnings are issued on a 4-point scale of increasing concern.

  • Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions - This level is reserved for nations where there may be pockets or crime or unrest, but the majority of the country is generally safe for U.S. travelers. Travelers should still be mindful of these warnings as there may be locations in these countries that, on their own, would qualify for a much higher travel advisory levels.
  • Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - This level applies to countries where Americans may be susceptible to higher than normal safety risks. There are a number of incidents that could trigger a level 2 designation including disaster recovery, high crime rates, mild political concerns, and/or the threat of terrorism. These issues may not be worth cancelling a trip over, but be sure to heed whatever warnings are issued - they are not to be ignored.
  • Level 3: Reconsider Travel - Destinations classified as level 3 (whether they be entire nations or specific regions within a country) should be avoided unless travel is absolutely necessary and safety precautions are taken. It takes serious activity to trigger a level 3 advisory such as a natural disaster, significant crime risks (including elevated incidents of violent crime, kidnapping, and/or sexual assault), health emergencies, terrorism, political uprisings, or civil unrest. Take any level 3 threat seriously.
  • Level 4: Do Not Travel - Traveling to a country or area that has earned a level 4 advisory - the highest advisory level the State Department issues - basically means that you are taking your safety (and possibly your life) into your own hands when traveling. The U.S. typically has limited abilities to ensure your well-being in these regions or provide support should you wind up in a crisis situation. Given that many of these nations are active conflict zones, terrorist hotbeds, and/or notably anti-American, the risks are great. Some of these nations will not permit Americans to enter. Those that do, will not go out of their way to offer protections or assurances of safety. Quite the contrary, many of these nations are quick to detain, incarcerate, or otherwise harass American nationals. Take the advisory's advice - do not travel to a level 4 destination.

The Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

If you choose to travel to or live in areas of unrest despite the travel warning, it would be in your best interest to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

STEP is the U.S. State Department's free program to keep international travelers and American expatriots up to date with all of the latest safety and security announcements. As an added benefit, enrolling in STEP also makes it easier for your nearest U.S. Embassy to contact you in the event of an emergency while ou are abroad. As such, you should make it a priority to keep all of your information in STEP up to date; it is particularly important when you enroll or update your information to include a current phone number and e-mail address.

While STEP is most conveniently accessed from an internet enabled devise like a computer or smartphone, U.S. citizens without internet access may enroll directly at the nearest U.S. Embassy.


The most recent high-level travel warnings issued by the U.S. Department of State are listed below with links to useful resources for a safer travel experience.


Burkina Faso

Level 4: Do Not Travel
June 5, 2020


Do not travel to Burkina Faso due to terrorism, crime, and kidnapping.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Burkina Faso. Terrorists may conduct attacks anywhere with little or no warning. Targets could include hotels, restaurants, police stations, customs offices, areas at or near mining sites, places of worship, military posts, and schools.

Kidnapping and hostage taking is a threat throughout the country.  On May 10, 2019 a hostage rescue operation freed four international hostages that had been kidnapped in Burkina Faso and in neighboring Benin.  

The Government of Burkina Faso has maintained a state of emergency in the entire East and Sahel regions, the provinces of Kossi and Sourou in the Boucle de Mouhoun region, the province of Kenedougou in the Hauts Bassins region, the province of Loroum in the North region, and the province of Koulpelogo in the Center-East region.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens throughout most of the country, as U.S. government personnel are restricted from travelling to regions outside the capitol due to security concerns. The U.S. Embassy prohibits U.S. government personnel from personal travel to the Karpala, Balkiui and Rayongo (also known as Dayongo) neighborhoods of Ouagadougou’s Arrondissement 11 due to the potential for security operations.

Family members under the age of 21 cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Burkina Faso.


Hong Kong SAR

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
June 2, 2020


Exercise Increased Caution due to the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China (COVID-19). Read the entire Travel Advisory.

A novel (new) coronavirus officially known as COVID-19 is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness that began in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization determined the rapidly spreading outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

The Hong Kong government has reported cases of the novel coronavirus in its special administrative region, has upgraded its response level to emergency, its highest response level, and is taking other steps to manage the novel coronavirus outbreak. On February 8, the Hong Kong government began enforcing a compulsory 14-day quarantine for anyone, regardless of nationality, arriving in Hong Kong who has visited mainland China within a 14-day period. This quarantine does not apply to individuals transiting Hong Kong International Airport and certain exempted groups such as flight crews. However, health screening measures are in place at all of Hong Kong’s borders and the Hong Kong authorities will quarantine individual travelers, including passengers transiting the Hong Kong International Airport, if the Hong Kong authorities determine the traveler to be a health risk.


Mozambique

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
 May 22, 2020

Exercise increased caution in Mozambique due to crime and health issues. Some areas have greater risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. 

Do Not Travel To:

  • Some northern districts in Cabo Delgado Province due to terrorism.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Pemba, the provincial capital of Cabo Delgado, due to threat of terrorism.
  • Some sections of the EN1 and EN6 in Sofala and Manica provinces due to crime.

Violent crime, such as mugging, is common.

Mozambique’s health infrastructure is limited: there are only three doctors per 100,000 people, frontline health providers are often poorly trained, and medicine shortages are common.  More than 1.2 million people in Mozambique have HIV/AIDS, representing a sizable population with compromised immune systems.  In the event of a public health emergency, access to an ICU and ventilator support is highly unlikely.

Burundi

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
April 20, 2020

General elections in Burundi are scheduled for May 20, 2020, which may be subject to change.  There is a heightened risk of violence during election periods, and during past elections there has been election-related violence. The Burundi government may impose travel restrictions as the elections approach, sometimes without notice, which may affect travel plans. Expect additional police and military checkpoints and possible roadblocks throughout the country during elections.

Violent crimes, such as grenade attacks and armed robbery, occur frequently. Though Westerners are unlikely to be targeted, the risk of being in the wrong place at the wrong time is high. Local police lack the resources and training to respond effectively to crimes.

Medical services in Burundi fall well below U.S. standards, and there are no adequate trauma services in the country. Emergency medical and fire services are limited or non-existent in some areas of the country.

Turkmenistan

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 31, 2020

Global Health Advisory: Do Not Travel. Avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

Reconsider Travel to Turkmenistan due to the Global Health Advisory and Embassy Ashgabat’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.  

On March 27, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of all family members of U.S. government employees under the age of 18 in addition to the authorized departure of non-emergency personnel and family members of U.S. government employees due to stringent travel restrictions and quarantine procedures that affect commercial flights.   

The Government of Turkmenistan has implemented enhanced screening and quarantine measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19.  All incoming international flights are being redirected to Turkmenabat, approximately 291 miles from Ashgabat.  Passengers will be required to undergo medical screening and possibly involuntary quarantine at local medical facilities.   

Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice. Visit the website of U.S. Embassy Ashgabat for additional information on these new measures.

Medical protocols in Turkmenistan are not consistent with U.S. standards and some travelers have been required to undergo medical testing unrelated to COVID-19.  Consider declining any medical testing unrelated to COVID-19.

Due to the possibility of quarantine of unknown length, carry additional supplies of necessary medication in carry-on luggage.  Contact the U.S. Embassy if you are subject to quarantine or prior to undergoing any invasive medical testing or procedures.

Israel, The West Bank and Gaza

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 27, 2020


Global Health Advisory: Do Not Travel. Avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

Reconsider travel to Israel and the West Bank due to travel restrictions and quarantine procedures instituted by the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority in response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). U.S. citizens who live in or seek travel to the United States are encouraged to depart Israel, the West Bank, or Gaza immediately while commercial flights are still available, unless they are prepared to remain in place for an indefinite period. Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions related to COVID-19 to be put into effect with little or no advance notice. Flights into or out of Israel may be cancelled with little or no notice.

The Embassy is not able to assist with arranging commercial travel options. If your travel has been disrupted or to make travel arrangements, please contact your airline.

Iraq

Level 4: Do Not Travel
March 26, 2020


Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict, the Global Health Advisory, and Mission Iraq’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

U.S. citizens in Iraq are at high risk for violence and kidnapping. Numerous terrorist and insurgent groups are active in Iraq and regularly attack both Iraqi security forces and civilians. Anti-U.S. sectarian militias threaten U.S. citizens and Western companies throughout Iraq. Attacks by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) occur in many areas of the country, including Baghdad.

On March 25, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of designated U.S. government employees from the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, the Baghdad Diplomatic support Center, and the U.S. Consulate General in Erbil due to security conditions and restricted travel options as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. On December 31, 2019, the Embassy suspended public consular services, until further notice, as a result of damage done by Iranian-backed terrorist attacks on the Embassy compound. U.S. Consulate General Erbil remains open and continues to provide consular services. On October 18, 2018, the Department of State ordered the suspension of operations at the U.S. Consulate General in Basrah. That institution has not reopened. Due to security concerns, U.S. Embassy personnel in Baghdad have been instructed not to use Baghdad International Airport.

Indonesia

Level 4: Do Not Travel
March 26, 2020


Do not travel to Indonesia due to the Global Health Advisory and Embassy Jakarta’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

On March 14, the Department of State authorized the departure of U.S. personnel and family members from any diplomatic or consular post in the world who have determined they are at higher risk if exposed to COVID-19 or who have requested departure based on a commensurate justification.

On March 25, the Department of State allowed for the Ordered Departure of all eligible family members (EFMs) under age 21 from Embassy Jakarta, Consulates Medan and Surabaya, and the U.S. Mission to ASEAN.

Commercial flight options may become limited, as well as decreased medical evacuation options from Indonesia. Indonesia’s health system has limited capacity to test for the virus causing COVID-19. Travelers should consider these factors and their health before traveling to Indonesia and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel.

If you travel to Indonesia, you should:

  • Have a plan to depart Indonesia which does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Read CDC information on COVID-19 and information about Indonesia.
  • Read the CDC’s latest recommendations for the most recent information on what you can do to reduce your risk of contracting COVID-19.
  • Exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Central Sulawesi and Papua due to civil unrest.

Mongolia

Level 4: Do Not Travel
March 18, 2020

Do Not Travel to Mongolia due to the Global Health Advisory and Mongolia’s suspension of all international travel in response to the ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 in neighboring countries.

On March 10, 2020, Mongolia suspended travel to and from foreign locations until at least March 28. Virtually all commercial flights, passenger rail, and auto traffic into and out of Mongolia are suspended during this time period. Domestic air and rail travel will also be suspended from March 10 until at least March 16.

On February 25, 2020, the Department of State allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all family members. On March 12, the Department ordered the departure of all nonessential personnel due to travel, transport, and other restrictions related to Mongolia’s response to the ongoing outbreak of COVID-19.

Travelers already in Mongolia should be prepared for the potential implementation of further measures with little or no advance notice affecting their ability to move within or depart from Mongolia. Travelers should also review and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus. U.S. citizens currently in Mongolia should attempt to depart by commercial means as soon as it becomes feasible to do so.

U.S. citizens remaining in Mongolia should follow the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Mongolian health authorities’ guidance for prevention, signs and symptoms, and treatment. We strongly urge U.S. citizens remaining in Mongolia to stay home as much as possible and limit contact with others, including large gatherings. Consider stocking up on food and other supplies to limit movement outside the home. If the situation deteriorates further, the ability of the U.S. Embassy to provide assistance to U.S. nationals within Mongolia may be limited.

Tajikistan  

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 18, 2020

Global Health Advisory: Do Not Travel. Avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

On March 13, 2020, the State Department allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency personnel and family members of U.S. government employees due to declining commercial flight availability and travel screening procedures implemented by the Government of Tajikistan.

Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice. Visit the U.S. Embassy Dushanbe website for additional information on these new measures.

Medical protocols in Tajikistan are not consistent with U.S. standards.  Consider declining any medical testing unrelated to COVID-19.  

Due to the possibility of quarantine of unknown length, carry additional supplies of necessary medication in carry-on luggage.  Contact the U.S. Embassy if you are subject to quarantine or prior to undergoing any invasive medical testing or procedures.

Please read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Tajikistan:

  • Have a plan to depart Tajikistan which does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Consult the CDC website for the most up-to-date information.  

U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Micronesia

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 18, 2020


Reconsider Travel to the Federated States of Micronesia due to the Global Health Advisory and Embassy Kolonia’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

On March 11, 2020, the Department of State allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. Government employees and all eligible family members due to stringent travel restrictions that affect commercial flights.

As of March 18, 2020, there are no confirmed COVID-19 cases in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), but the country’s health system has limited capacity for handling an outbreak.  A recent reduction in commercial flights and difficulty in arranging medevac flights may make it difficult or impossible to seek medical evacuation.  Travelers should consider these factors and their health before traveling to the FSM and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel.

The Government of the Federated States of Micronesia has announced several precautionary measures including:

  • Persons traveling to the FSM directly or indirectly, either by air or sea, from anywhere in the People’s Republic of China, excluding the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau, since January 6, 2020 are banned from entering the FSM.
  • Persons traveling to the FSM from a country, jurisdiction, or area with a confirmed COVID-19 case are not allowed to enter the FSM unless they have stayed in a country state or territory without COVID-19 for a period of no less than 14 days.
  • As of March 7, persons with travel originating from Guam may enter the FSM.
  • FSM airport officials are checking the temperature of all arriving passengers.

Lebanon

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 18, 2020


Global Health Advisory: Do Not Travel. Avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

Reconsider travel Lebanon due to crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest and dueto the Global Health Advisory and Embassy Beirut’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

On March 18, 2020, the Department of State allowed for the ordered departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all eligible family members due to stringent travel restrictions and quarantine procedures that affect commercial flights.

Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • the border with Syria due to terrorism and armed conflict
  • the border with Israel due to the potential for armed conflict
  • refugee settlements due to the potential for armed conflict

U.S. citizens should reconsider or avoid travel to certain areas in Lebanon because of the threats of terrorism, armed clashes, kidnapping, and outbreaks of violence, especially near Lebanon’s borders with Syria and Israel. U.S. citizens living and working in Lebanon should be aware of the risks of remaining in the country and should carefully consider those risks.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Lebanon should be aware that consular officers from the U.S. Embassy are not always able to travel to assist them. The Department of State considers the threat to U.S. government personnel in Beirut sufficiently serious to require them to live and work under strict security restrictions. The internal security policies of the U.S. Embassy may be adjusted at any time and without advance notice.

Nauru

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
March 11, 2020

Exercise normal precautions in Nauru.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Nauru:

Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.


Azerbaijan

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
March 6, 2020

Reconsider travel to Azerbaijan due to an outbreak of COVID-19 and responsive measures implemented by the Government of Azerbaijan.

Reconsider travel to Azerbaijan due to the risk of a significant increase of COVID-19 cases emanating from the Iranian border and the Government of Azerbaijan’s response to COVID-19. The Government of Azerbaijan is screening international travelers for symptoms of COVID-19 and has implemented mandatory quarantine for suspected cases in designated quarantine facilities. Travel restrictions imposed in other countries and reduced commercial flight availability may impede people seeking medical evacuation. Medical care in Azerbaijan is not consistent with U.S. standards and basic medical supplies may be unavailable in some areas. Travelers should consider these factors and their health before traveling to Azerbaijan and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel.

On March 6, 2020 the Department of State allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and their family members.

Azerbaijan has a longstanding risk presented by terrorist groups, who continue plotting possible attacks in Azerbaijan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Level 4 - Do not travel to:

The Nagorno-Karabakh region due to armed conflict.

Egypt

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
March 6, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Egypt due to terrorism, and to the Embassy’s limited ability to assist dual U.S.-Egyptian citizens who are arrested or detained. Some areas have increased risk.

Do not travel to:

  • The Sinai Peninsula (with the exception of travel to Sharm El-Sheikh by air) due to terrorism.
  • The Western Desert due to terrorism.
  • Egyptian border areas due to military zones.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Egypt. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, and have targeted diplomatic facilities, tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, western businesses, restaurants, resorts, and local government facilities. Terrorists have conducted attacks in urban areas, including in Cairo, despite the heavy security presence. Terrorists have targeted religious sites, to include mosques, churches, monasteries, and buses traveling to these locations.

Haiti

Level 4: Do Not Travel
March 5, 2020


Do not travel to Haiti due to crime, civil unrest, and kidnapping.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery and carjacking, is common. Kidnapping is widespread. Kidnappers may use sophisticated planning or take advantage of unplanned opportunities. Victims have included U.S. citizens. 
Demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and can turn violent. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. Emergency response, including ambulance service, is limited or non-existent.

Travelers are sometimes followed and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. The U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport. Robbers and carjackers have attacked private vehicles stuck in heavy traffic congestion and often target lone drivers, particularly women driving alone.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in some areas of Haiti. U.S. government personnel are discouraged from walking in most neighborhoods. Only adult family members over the age of 18 are permitted to accompany U.S. government employees assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince. U.S. government personnel in Haiti are prohibited from:

  • Visiting establishments after dark without secure, on-site parking;
  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis;
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs;
  • Driving outside of Port-au-Prince at night;
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Visiting certain parts of the city at any time without prior approval and special security measures in place.


Tuvalu

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
March 3, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Tuvalu.

If you decide to travel to Tuvalu:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Marshall Islands

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
March 3, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Tuvalu.

If you decide to travel to Marshall Islands:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.

South Korea

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
February 29, 2020


Reconsider travel to South Korea due to an outbreak of COVID-19. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Level 4 - Do Not Travel to:

  •  Daegu due to the level of community transmission of the virus and imposition of local quarantine procedures.

A novel coronavirus is causing an outbreak of COVID-19 in South Korea. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization determined the COVID-19 outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).  The South Korean government has reported cases of the COVID-19 in the country and has upgraded its response level to “grave”, its highest response level. On February 24, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a Level 3 Travel Warning ­ Avoid Non-essential Travel for South Korea.  Travelers should review and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel to South Korea.  If suspected to have COVID-19 (coronavirus) in South Korea, you may face travel delays, quarantine, and extremely expensive medical costs.

If you travel to South Korea, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends individuals take the following steps:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Discuss travel to South Korea with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with chronic medical conditions may be at risk for more severe disease.
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty. It is especially important to clean hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.

If you spent time in South Korea during the past 14 days and feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends individuals:

  • Seek medical advice. Call ahead before going to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel to South Korea, and your symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean your hands by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.  Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.

Italy

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
February 29, 2020


Reconsider travel to Italy due to a recent outbreak of COVID-19

Level 4 - Do Not Travel to:

  • Lombardy and Veneto due to the level of community transmission of the virus and imposition of local quarantine procedures.

There is a widespread ongoing outbreak of respiratory illness (COVID-19) caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that can be spread from person to person.  Many cases of COVID-19 have been associated with travel to or from mainland China or close contact with a travel-related case, but widespread sustained community spread has been reported in Italy.  The CDC has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Italy.  At this time, CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to Italy.  Travelers should review and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel to Italy. Italy has a longstanding risk presented by terrorist groups, who continue plotting possible attacks in Italy. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page. If you decide to travel to Italy:

  • Read the Centers for Disease Control’s and Prevention guidelines for the prevention of COVID-19 and information on health conditions in Italy.
  • Review the Embassy’s latest alerts and the embassy’s webpage on COVID-19 in Italy for additional information. Follow Italian health official guidance and avoid government-designated affected areas.
  • Have a plan to depart from Italy that does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Italy.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Iran

Level 4: Do Not Travel
February 26, 2020


Do not travel to Iran due to the risk of kidnapping and the arbitrary arrest and detention of U.S. citizens. Those present in Iran should exercise increased caution due to an outbreak of COVID-19.

Country Summary: U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Iran have been kidnapped, arrested, and detained on spurious charges. Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. citizens, particularly dual national Iranian-Americans--including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics--on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. Iranian authorities routinely delay consular access to detained U.S. citizens and consistently deny consular access to dual U.S.-Iranian citizens.

A novel (new) coronavirus disease, recently designated as COVID-19 and also known as the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness in several countries around the world. The first cases of COVID-19 were reported in China in December 2019. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization determined the rapidly spreading outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Iran is experiencing sustained community spread of COVID-19. The virus can spread from person to person. Older adults and those with chronic medical conditions should consider postponing nonessential travel. U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Iran should review and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus. Individuals suspected of having COVID-19 may face travel delays, quarantine, and high medical costs. Several countries have closed their borders with Iran and/or suspended air traffic to and from Iran. As a result, commercial travel to and from Iran may become severely limited with little or no notice.


Japan

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
February 22, 2020

Exercise Increased Caution due to an outbreak of COVID-19 (also known as the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2).  

A novel (new) coronavirus disease, recently designated as COVID-19, is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness. The first cases of COVID-19 were reported in China in December 2019. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization determined the rapidly spreading outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.   

Many cases of COVID-19 have been associated with travel to or from mainland China or close contact with a travel-related case, but sustained community spread has been reported in Japan. Sustained community spread means that people in Japan have been infected with the virus, but how or where they became infected is not known, and the spread is ongoing. The CDC has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice.

Because older adults and those with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk for severe disease, people in these groups should discuss travel with a healthcare provider and consider postponing nonessential travel.

Travelers should review and follow the Centers for Disease Control’s guidelines for the prevention of coronavirus if they decide to travel to Japan. If suspected to have Coronavirus in Japan, you may face travel delays, quarantine, and extremely expensive medical costs. 

If you travel to Japan, you should:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Discuss travel to Japan with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Japan.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Ukraine

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
February 19, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Ukraine due to crime and civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Crimea due to arbitrary detentions and other abuses by Russian occupation authorities.
  • The eastern parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts, especially the non-government-controlled areas, due to armed conflict.

Crime targeting foreigners and property is common. Demonstrations, which have turned violent at times, regularly occur throughout Ukraine, including in Kyiv. Politically targeted assassinations and bombings have also occurred. There are reports of violence by extreme nationalist groups.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits U.S. civil aviation from flying in the Ukrainian Simferopol (UKFV) and Dnipropetrovsk (UKDV) Flight Information Regions.

Guinea

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
February 13, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Guinea due to civil unrest.

Country Summary: Demonstrations occur frequently throughout the country and are often sporadic and unplanned, making it difficult to predict the size, route, or level of violence or congestion that may occur. Recent demonstrations throughout Middle Guinea, which includes Labe, Mamou, Pita, and Dalaba, have been particularly violent.

Any demonstration may turn violent, resulting in injuries and even fatalities. Demonstrators may attack vehicles that attempt to pass through or around the protests, resulting in serious injuries and vehicular damage. Criminals are known to take advantage of the resulting traffic congestion to rob drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Uniformed security forces may also extort drivers and passengers during these incidents.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Guinea:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Guinea.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Macau SAR

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
February 11, 2020


Exercise Increased Caution due to the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

A novel (new) coronavirus is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness that began in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. On January 30, 2020 the World Health Organization determined the rapidly spreading outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

The Macau government has reported cases of the novel coronavirus in its special administrative region. In an effort to contain the novel coronavirus, the Macau government has placed restrictions on entry to its special administration region on individuals who have been to Hubei Province, China within the previous 14 days and may quarantine those they believe could have been exposed to the coronavirus.

As of February 4, ferry services between Hong Kong and Macau have been suspended and flights from Macau International Airport have been reduced. Also, bus drivers may refuse passengers who do not wear face masks.

On February 10, 2020 the Department of State allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and their family members due to the novel coronavirus and the impact to Mission personnel as schools and some public facilities have been closed until further notice.

The Department of State has raised the Travel Advisory for China to Level 4: Do Not Travel due to the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Warning: Avoid all nonessential travel to China.

If you must travel to Macau, you should:

  • Monitor the Macau government’s website for further updates on the coronavirus infection.
  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Discuss travel to Macau with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease.
  • Avoid animals (alive or dead), animal markets, and products that come from animals (such as uncooked meat).
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Maintain drainage pipes properly and add water to U-traps regularly.
  • Put the toilet lid down before you flush to prevent the spread of germs.

If you traveled to Macau in the last 14 days and feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, you should:

  • Seek medical care right away. Before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Wear a mask and seek medical advice promptly if unwell.

Russia

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
February 10, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Russia due to terrorism, harassment, and the arbitrary enforcement of local laws. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • The North Caucasus, including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus, due to terrorism, kidnapping, and risk of civil unrest.
  • Crimea due to Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian territory and abuses by its occupying authorities.

Terrorist groups, transnational and local terrorist organizations, and individuals inspired by extremist ideology continue plotting possible attacks in Russia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Thailand

Level 1: Normal Precautions
February 7, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Thailand. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla provinces due to civil unrest.

If you decide to travel to Thailand:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Thailand.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla Provinces – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Periodic violence directed mostly at Thai government interests by a domestic insurgency continues to affect security in the southernmost provinces of Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla. U.S. citizens are at risk of death or injury due to the possibility of indiscriminate attacks in public places. Martial law is in force in this region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these provinces as U.S government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these provinces.

Palau

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
February 4, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Palau.

If you decide to travel to Palau:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.


China

Level 4: Do Not Travel
February 2, 2020


Do not travel to China due to the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China. On January 30, the World Health Organization (WHO) determined the rapidly spreading outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Travelers should be prepared for the possibility of travel restrictions with little or no advance notice. Most commercial air carriers have reduced or suspended routes to and from China.

Those currently in China should attempt to depart by commercial means. U.S. citizens remaining in China should follow the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Chinese health authorities’ guidance for prevention, signs and symptoms, and treatment. We strongly urge U.S. citizens remaining in China to stay home as much as possible and limit contact with others, including large gatherings. Consider stocking up on food and other supplies to limit movement outside the home. In the event that the situation deteriorates further, the ability of the U.S.  Embassy and Consulates to provide assistance to U.S. nationals within China may be limited.

In an effort to contain the novel coronavirus, the Chinese authorities have suspended air, road, and rail travel in the area around Wuhan and placed restrictions on travel and other activities throughout the country. On January 23, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of all non-emergency U.S. personnel and their family members from Wuhan. On January 29, 2020, the Department of State allowed for the voluntary departure of non-emergency personnel and family members of U.S. government employees from China. On January 31, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of all family members under age 21 of U.S. personnel in China.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a warning for all of China. The CDC has published suggestions on how to reduce your risk of contracting the Novel Coronavirus. Visit the CDC webpage for expanded information about the Novel Coronavirus, including prevention, signs and symptoms, and treatment.

Pakistan

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
January 31, 2020

Reconsider travel to Pakistan due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk; Please read the entire Travel Advisory. Do Not Travel to:

  • Balochistan province and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, including the former Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), due to terrorism and kidnapping.
  • The immediate vicinity of the Line of Control due to terrorism and the potential for armed conflict.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Pakistan. A local history of terrorism and ongoing ideological aspirations of violence by extremist elements have led to indiscriminate attacks on civilian as well as local military and police targets. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, military installations, airports, universities, tourist locations, schools, hospitals, places of worship, and government facilities. Terrorists have targeted U.S. diplomats and diplomatic facilities in the past.

Solomon Islands

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
January 29, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Solomon Islands.

If you decide to travel to Solomon Islands:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.


Luxembourg

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
January 29, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Luxembourg.

If you decide to travel to Luxembourg:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.


Australia

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions
January 21, 2020


Exercise normal precautions in Australia. Areas affected by bushfires have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution in areas affected by bushfires and air quality issues

  • Visitors should exercise increased caution when considering travel to areas affected by bushfires until the risks posed by bushfires, and resulting poor air quality, have passed.
  • Authorities may issue evacuation orders to certain areas as conditions warrant. Travelers should follow local evacuation orders.
  • Smoke from bushfires is causing poor air quality, which can increase health risks for travelers with related health conditions. Check the air quality for your destinations and take precautions as needed.
  • Monitor local news media outlets for updates on areas under evacuation.
  • Dial 000 (triple zero) for immediate assistance from the police, ambulance service, or fire brigade.

Serbia

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
January 16, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Serbia due to crime.

Violence associated with organized crime and high-profile sporting events in Serbia is common.

Organized criminal activities such as car bombings and assassinations by shooting can occur in all areas at any time.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Serbia:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave the original in your hotel safe.
  • Provide your itinerary to a family member or friend.
  • Monitor local media.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Timor-Leste

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
January 15, 2020


Exercise increased caution in Timor-Leste due to crime and civil unrest.  

Country Summary: Timor-Leste has seen isolated instances of police responding to protests with force and the use of tear gas. Stone throwing attacks on vehicles can occur during gang conflicts and periods of unrest. Gender-based violence is high in Timor-Leste, and sexual harassment is fairly common.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Timor-Leste:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid demonstrations or crowds.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Timor-Leste.
  • Visit the CDC Travelers Health Page.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Slovenia

Level 1: Exercise Normal Precuations
January 15, 2020

If you decide to travel to Slovenia:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Slovenia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.

Brazil  

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
January 14, 2020

Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, and carjacking, is common in urban areas, day and night.  Gang activity and organized crime is widespread.  Assaults are common.  U.S. government personnel are discouraged from using public, municipal buses in all parts of Brazil due to an elevated risk of robbery and assault at any time of day, and especially at night.

If you decide to travel to Brazil:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid walking on beaches after dark.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Use caution at, or going to, major transportation centers or on public transportation, especially at night.  Passengers face an elevated risk of robbery or assault using public, municipal bus transportation throughout Brazil.  
  • Use increased caution when hiking in isolated areas.

Costa Rica  

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
January 7, 2020

While petty crime is the predominant threat for tourists in Costa Rica, violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault, occurs in Costa Rica. The Costa Rican government provides additional security resources in areas frequented by tourists.

If you decide to travel to Costa Rica:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.

Congo, Democratic Republic of the

Level 3: Reconsider Travel
January 2, 2020


Reconsider travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) due to crime, civil unrest, and Ebola. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • North Kivu, South Kivu, and Ituri provinces due to Ebola
  • North Kivu and Ituri provinces due to terrorism.
  • The eastern DRC region and the three Kasai provinces (Kasai, Kasai-Oriental, Kasai-Central) due to crime, civil unrest, armed conflict and kidnapping.

Nepal

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
January 2, 2020

Exercise increased caution in Nepal due to the potential for isolated political violence.

Political demonstrations intended to be peaceful can sometimes escalate into violence and may be met with force by Nepali authorities.

If you decide to travel to Nepal:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Do not trek alone.
  • Be aware that infrastructure, government services and medical assistance may not be up to U.S. standards.
Source: U.S. Department of State
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